AHA ACLS, BLS, PALS, NRP, PEARS, ACLS EP, PHTLS and Heartsaver First Aid, CPR/AED Saving American Hearts, Inc 6165 Lehman Drive Suite 202 Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918 Catherine Brinkley (719) 551-1222 email: admin@savingamericanhearts.com

March 6, 2015 AHA PALS Pediatric Advanced Life Support Skills Session 3 AM to 5 AM at Saving American Hearts 6165 Lehman Drive Suite 209 Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918.

March 6, 2015 AHA PALS Pediatric Advanced Life Support Skills Session 3 AM to 5 AM at Saving American Hearts 6165 Lehman Drive Suite 209 Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918.
March 6, 2015 AHA PALS Pediatric Advanced Life Support Skills Session 3 AM to 5 AM at Saving American Hearts 6165 Lehman Drive Suite 209 Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918.
Item# 0306201535PSS
$75.00





Welcome to the Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) Skills Session American Heart Association !

All classes are held at:

Saving American Hearts

6165 Lehman Drive

Suite 209

Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918.

The cost of this course is $75. You must bring your Heartcode PALS Part 1 completion certificate with you to class. *Heartcode PALS Part 1 is the online course. Parts 2 and 3 is the skills session portion of the course.

This is a hands on skill practice and testing course.

You will first practice, and then be tested on:

1 and 2 rescuer infant and child CRP using a bag mask device and an AED

Intraosseous access (I/O access)

Fluid bolus administration using a syringe and stop-cock device

You will then practice and be tested on the following Core Case Scenarios

You must successfully complete all skills competencies above and 1 cardiac or rhythm disturbance case and 1 respiratory or shock case.

Upon successful completion of all 3 parts of the course you will receive your American Heart Association PALS Provider card via regular mail issued by your instructor's training center.

I have included the core case testing scenarios for you to look over.

If you will send me an email to admin@savingamericanhearts.com and request the core case scenarios I will email them to you. These are the cases from your provider manual or your online course.

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Learning Station Competency Checklists For Pediatric Advanced Life Support AHA 2010 Guidelines

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Respiratory Learning Station Competency Checklists

Core Case 1 Upper Airway Obstruction

Use this checklist during the PALS core case simulations and tests to check off the performance of the team leader.

CRITICAL PERFORMANCE STEPS DETAILS

TEAM LEADER

Assigns team member roles

Uses effective communication throughout

Closed-loop communication

Clear messages

Clear roles and responsibilities

Knowing limitations Knowledge sharing Constructive intervention Reevaluation and summarizing

Mutual respect

PATIENT MANAGEMENT

Directs assessment of airway, breathing, circulation Team leader directs or performs assessment to determine disability, and exposure, including vital signs responsiveness, breathing and pulse

Team leader directs manual airway maneuver and administration of 100% oxygen

Team leader directs that pads/leads be properly placed and that monitor be turned onto an appropriate lead; requests use of pulse oximetry

Team leader verbalizes features of history and exam that indicate upper airway obstruction

Team leader verbalizes whether patient is in respiratory distress or failure

Team leader verbalizes that for patient with ineffective ventilations or poor oxygenation, assisted ventilations are required

Directs IV or IO access

Team leader directs team member to place IV (or IO) access, if appropriate; placement simulated properly

Directs reassessment of patient in response to treatment Team leader directs team member to reassess airway, breathing and circulation

CASE CONCLUSION

Team leader summarizes specific treatments for upper airway obstruction (IM epinephrine, racemic epinephrine, CPAP)

If scope of practice applies: Verbalizes indications for endotracheal intubation (child unable to maintain adequate when intubation is anticipated airway, oxygenation, or ventilation despite initial intervention).

Notes need to anticipate use of an ET tube smaller than predicted for age, especially is subglottic narrowing is suspected.

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Core Case 2 Lower Airway Obstruction

Use this checklist during the PALS core case simulations and tests to check off the performance of the team leader.

CRITICAL PERFORMANCE STEPS DETAILS

TEAM LEADER

Assigns team member roles

Uses effective communication throughout

Closed-loop communication

Clear messages

Clear roles and responsibilities

Knowing limitations Knowledge sharing Constructive intervention Reevaluation and summarizing

Mutual respect

PATIENT MANAGEMENT

Directs assessment of airway, breathing, circulation Team leader directs or performs assessment to determine disability, and exposure, including vital signs airway patency, adequacy of breathing and circulation, level of responsiveness, temperature and vital signs

Team leader directs manual airway maneuver and administration of 100% oxygen

Team leader directs that pads/leads be properly placed and that monitor be turned onto an appropriate lead; requests use of pulse oximetry

Recognizes signs and symptoms of lower airway obstruction

Team leader verbalizes features of history and exam that indicate lower airway obstruction

Categorizes as respiratory distress or failure

Team leader verbalizes whether patient is in respiratory distress or failure

Verbalizes indications for assisted ventilations Team leader verbalizes that for patient with ineffective ventilations or poor oxygenation, assisted ventilations are required

Directs IV or IO access Team leader directs team member to place IV (or IO) access, if appropriate; placement simulated properly

Directs reassessment of patient in response to treatment Team leader directs team member to reassess airway, breathing and circulation

CASE CONCLUSION

Summarizes specific treatment for lower airway obstruction Team leader summarizes specific treatments for lower airway obstruction (nebulized albuterol)

If scope of practice applies: Verbalizes indications for endotracheal intubation and special considerations (child unable to maintain adequate when intubation is anticipated airway, oxygenation, or ventilation despite initial intervention).



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Core Case 3 Lung Tissue Disease

Use this checklist during the PALS core case simulations and tests to check off the performance of the team leader.

CRITICAL PERFORMANCE STEPS DETAILS

TEAM LEADER

Assigns team member roles

Uses effective communication throughout

Closed-loop communication

Clear messages

Clear roles and responsibilities

Knowing limitations Knowledge sharing Constructive intervention Reevaluation and summarizing

Mutual respect

PATIENT MANAGEMENT

Directs assessment of airway, breathing, circulation

Team leader directs or performs assessment to determine disability, and exposure, including vital signs airway patency, adequacy of breathing and circulation, level of responsiveness, temperature and vital signs

Team leader directs assisted ventilation with administration of 100% oxygen

Ensures that bag-mask ventilations are effective

Team leader observes or directs team member to observe for chest rise and breath sounds

Directs placement of pads/leads and pulse oximetry

Team leader directs that pads/leads be properly placed and that monitor be turned onto an appropriate lead; requests use of pulse oximetry

Recognizes signs and symptoms of lung tissue disease

Team leader verbalizes features of history and exam that indicate lung tissue disease

Categorizes as respiratory distress or failure

Team leader verbalizes whether patient is in respiratory distress or failure

Verbalizes indications for assisted ventilations Team leader verbalizes that for patient with ineffective ventilations or poor oxygenation, assisted ventilations are required

Directs IV or IO access

Team leader directs team member to place IV (or IO) access, if appropriate; placement simulated properly

Directs reassessment of patient in response to treatment Team leader directs team member to reassess airway, breathing and circulation

CASE CONCLUSION

Summarizes specific treatment for lung tissue disease

Team leader summarizes specific treatments for lung tissue disease (antibiotics for suspected pneumonia)

If scope of practice applies: Verbalizes indications

endotracheal intubation and special considerations

Team leader verbalizes need for endotracheal intubation (child unable to maintain adequate oxygenation, or ventilation despite initial intervention).

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Core Case 4 Disordered Control of Breathing

Use this checklist during the PALS core case simulations and tests to check off the performance of the team leader.

CRITICAL PERFORMANCE STEPS DETAILS

TEAM LEADER

Assigns team member roles

Uses effective communication throughout

Closed-loop communication

Clear messages

Clear roles and responsibilities

Knowing limitations Knowledge sharing Constructive intervention Reevaluation and summarizing

Mutual respect

PATIENT MANAGEMENT

Directs assessment of airway, breathing, circulation

Team leader directs or performs assessment to determine disability, and exposure, including vital signs airway patency, adequacy of breathing and circulation, level of responsiveness, temperature and vital signs

Directs assisted ventilations with administration of 100% oxygen

Team leader directs assisted ventilation with administration of 100% oxygen

Ensures that bag-mask ventilations are effective

Team leader observes or directs team member to observe for chest rise with assisted ventilations

Directs placement of pads/leads and pulse oximetry

Team leader directs that pads/leads be properly placed and that monitor be turned onto an appropriate lead; requests use of pulse oximetry

Recognizes signs and symptoms of disordered control of breathing

Team leader verbalizes features of history and exam that indicate disordered control of breathing

Categorizes as respiratory distress or failure

Team leader verbalizes whether patient is in respiratory distress failure (note that respiratory failure can occur without distress in this setting)

Directs IV or IO access

Team leader directs team member to place IV (or IO) access, if appropriate; placement simulated properly

Directs reassessment of patient in response to treatment

Team leader directs team member to reassess airway, breathing and circulation

CASE CONCLUSION

Summarizes specific treatment for disordered control of breathing

Team leader summarizes specific treatments for disordered control of breathing (sedation reversal agents)

If scope of practice applies: Verbalizes indications for endotracheal intubation and special considerations (child unable to maintain adequate airway, oxygenation, or ventilation despite initial intervention).



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Core Case 5 Hypovolemic Shock

Use this checklist during the PALS core case simulations and tests to check off the performance of the team leader.

CRITICAL PERFORMANCE STEPS DETAILS

TEAM LEADER

Assigns team member roles

Uses effective communication throughout

Closed-loop communication

Clear messages

Clear roles and responsibilities

Knowing limitations Knowledge sharing Constructive intervention Reevaluation and summarizing

Mutual respect

PATIENT MANAGEMENT

Directs assessment of airway, breathing, circulation

Team leader directs or performs assessment to determine disability, and exposure, including vital signs airway patency, adequacy of breathing and circulation, level of responsiveness, temperature and vital signs

Directs administration of 100% oxygen

Team leader directs administration of 100% oxygen

Directs placement of pads/leads and pulse oximetry

Team leader directs that pads/leads be properly placed and that monitor be turned onto an appropriate lead; requests use of pulse oximetry

Recognizes signs and symptoms of hypovolemic shock

Team leader verbalizes features of history and exam that indicate hypovolemic shock

Categorizes as compensated or hypotensive shock

Team leader verbalizes whether patient is compensated or hypotensive

Directs IV or IO access

Team leader directs team member to place IV (or IO) access, if appropriate; placement simulated properly

Directs rapid administration of a fluid bolus of isotonic cyrstalloid

Team leader directs administration of isotonic crystalloid 20mL/kg rapidly (over 5 to 20 minutes) IV or IO

Directs reassessment of patient in response to treatment Team leader directs team member to reassess airway, breathing and circulation

CASE CONCLUSION

Verbalizes therapeutic end points during shock

Team leader identifies parameters that indicate response to management therapy (heart rate, blood pressure, distal pulses and capillary refill, urine output, mental status)



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Core Case 6 Obstructive Shock

Use this checklist during the PALS core case simulations and tests to check off the performance of the team leader.

CRITICAL PERFORMANCE STEPS DETAILS

TEAM LEADER

Assigns team member roles

Uses effective communication throughout

Closed-loop communication

Clear messages

Clear roles and responsibilities

Knowing limitations Knowledge sharing Constructive intervention Reevaluation and summarizing

Mutual respect

PATIENT MANAGEMENT

Directs assessment of airway, breathing, circulation

Team leader directs or performs assessment to determine disability, and exposure, including vital signs airway patency, adequacy of breathing and circulation, level of responsiveness, temperature and vital signs

Directs placement of pads/leads and pulse oximetry

Team leader directs that pads/leads be properly placed and that monitor be turned onto an appropriate lead; requests use of pulse oximetry

Verbalizes DOPE mnemonic for intubated patient

Team leader reviews elements of DOPE mnemonic who deteriorates (displacement, obstruction, pneumothorax, equipment failure)

Recognizes signs and symptoms of obstructive

Team leader verbalizes features of history and exam that indicate shock obstructive shock

States at least 2 causes of obstructive shock

Team leader states at least 2 common causes of obstructive shock (tension pneumothorax, cardiac tamponade, pulmonary embolus)

Categorizes as compensated or hypotensive shock

Team leader verbalizes whether patient is compensated or hypotensive

Directs IV or IO access

Team leader directs team member to place IV (or IO) access, if appropriate; placement simulated properly

Directs rapid administration of a fluid bolus of isotonic cyrstalloid

Team leader directs administration of isotonic crystalloid 10-20mL/kg rapidly (over 5 to 20 minutes) IV or IO

Directs reassessment of patient in response to treatment Team leader directs team member to reassess airway, breathing and circulation

CASE CONCLUSION

Summarizes the treatment for a tension pneumothorax

Team leader describes use of emergency pleural decom- pression (second intercostal space, midclavicular line)

Verbalizes therapeutic end points during shock

Team leader identifies parameters that indicate response to management therapy (heart rate, blood pressure, distal pulses and capillary refill, urine output, mental status)

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Core Case 7 Distributive Shock

Use this checklist during the PALS core case simulations and tests to check off the performance of the team leader.

CRITICAL PERFORMANCE STEPS DETAILS

TEAM LEADER

Assigns team member roles

Uses effective communication throughout

Closed-loop communication

Clear messages

Clear roles and responsibilities

Knowing limitations Knowledge sharing Constructive intervention Reevaluation and summarizing

Mutual respect

PATIENT MANAGEMENT

Directs assessment of airway, breathing, circulation

Team leader directs or performs assessment to determine disability, and exposure, including vital signs airway patency, adequacy of breathing and circulation, level of responsiveness, temperature and vital signs

Directs administration of 100% oxygen

Team leader directs administration of 100% oxygen

Directs placement of pads/leads and pulse oximetry

Team leader directs that pads/leads be properly placed and that monitor be turned onto an appropriate lead; requests use of pulse oximetry

Recognizes signs and symptoms of distributive (septic) shock

Team leader verbalizes features of history and exam that indicate distributive (septic) shock

Categorizes as compensated or hypotensive shock

Team leader verbalizes whether patient is compensated or hypotensive

Directs IV or IO access

Team leader directs team member to place IV (or IO) access, if appropriate; placement simulated properly

Directs rapid administration of a fluid bolus of isotonic cyrstalloid

Team leader directs administration of isotonic crystalloid 20mL/kg rapidly (over 5 to 20 minutes) IV or IO

Directs reassessment of patient in response to treatment Team leader directs team member to reassess airway, breathing and circulation

CASE CONCLUSION

Summarizes indications for vasoactive drug support

Team leader verbalizes that vasoactive medications are indicated for fluid-refractory septic shock

Verbalizes therapeutic end points during shock therapy

Team leader identifies parameters that indicate response to management (heart rate, blood pressure, distal pulses and capillary refill, urine output, mental status)

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Core Case 8 Cardiogenic Shock

Use this checklist during the PALS core case simulations and tests to check off the performance of the team leader.

CRITICAL PERFORMANCE STEPS DETAILS

TEAM LEADER

Assigns team member roles

Uses effective communication throughout

Closed-loop communication

Clear messages

Clear roles and responsibilities

Knowing limitations Knowledge sharing Constructive intervention Reevaluation and summarizing

Mutual respect

PATIENT MANAGEMENT

Directs assessment of airway, breathing, circulation

Team leader directs or performs assessment to determine disability, and exposure, including vital signs responsiveness, breathing and pulse

Directs administration of 100% oxygen

Team leader directs administration of 100% oxygen by high flow device

Directs placement of pads/leads and pulse oximetry

Team leader directs that pads/leads be properly placed and that monitor be turned onto an appropriate lead; requests use of pulse oximetry

Recognizes signs and symptoms of cardiogenic shock Team leader verbalizes features of history and exam that indicate cardiogenic shock

Categorizes as compensated or hypotensive shock

Team leader verbalizes whether patient is compensated or hypotensive

Directs IV or IO access

Team leader directs team member to place IV (or IO) access, if appropriate; placement simulated properly

Directs slow administration of 5 to 10 mL/kg isotonic crystalloid

Team leader directs administration of fluid bolus of isotonic cyrstalloid 5-10mL/kg IV or IO (over 10 to 20 minutes) while carefully monitoring patient for signs of pulmonary edema or worsening heart failure

Directs reassessment of patient in response to treatment

Team leader directs team member to reassess airway, breathing and circulation

Recalls indications for use of vasoactive drugs

Team leader verbalizes indications for initiation of vasoactive drugs during cardiogenic shock (persistent signs of shock despite fluid therapy)

CASE CONCLUSION

Summarizes indications for vasoactive drug support

Team leader verbalizes that vasoactive medications are indicated for fluid-refractory septic shock

Verbalizes therapeutic end points during shock management

Team leader identifies parameters that indicate response to therapy (heart rate, blood pressure, perfusion,, urine output, mental status). In cardiogenic shock, team leader recognizes importance of reducing metabolic demand by reducing work of breathing and temperature.

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Core Case 9 Supraventricular Tachycardia

Use this checklist during the PALS core case simulations and tests to check off the performance of the team leader.

CRITICAL PERFORMANCE STEPS DETAILS

TEAM LEADER

Assigns team member roles

Uses effective communication throughout

Closed-loop communication

Clear messages

Clear roles and responsibilities

Knowing limitations Knowledge sharing Constructive intervention Reevaluation and summarizing

Mutual respect

PATIENT MANAGEMENT

Directs assessment of airway, breathing, circulation

Team leader directs or performs assessment to determine disability, and exposure, including vital signs airway patency, adequacy of breathing and circulation, level of responsiveness, temperature and vital signs

Directs administration of supplementary oxygen

Team leader directs administration of supplementary oxygen by high flow device

Directs placement of pads/leads and pulse oximetry

Team leader directs that pads/leads be properly placed and that monitor be turned onto an appropriate lead; requests use of pulse oximetry

Recognizes narrow-complex tachycardia and

Team leader recognizes narrow-complex tachycardia and verbalizes how to distinguish between ST and SVT

verbalizes reasons for identification as SVT versus ST

Categorizes as compensated or hypotensive shock

Team leader verbalizes whether patient is compensated or hypotensive

Directs performance of appropriate vagal maneuvers

Team leader directs team member to perform appropriate vagal maneuvers (Valsalva, blowing through straw, ice to face)

Directs IV or IO access

Team leader directs team member to place IV (or IO) access, if appropriate; placement simulated properly

Directs preparation and administration of appropriate

Team leader directs team member to prepare correct dose of dose of adenosine adenosine (first dose: 0.1 mg/kg, maximum: 6 mg second dose: 0.2 mg/kg, maximum 12 mg) uses drug dose resource if needed: states need for rapid administration with use of saline flush

Directs reassessment of patient in response to treatment Team leader directs team member to reassess airway, breathing and circulation

CASE CONCLUSION

Verbalizes indications and appropriate energy doses for synchronized cardioversion

Team leader verbalizes indications and correct energy dose for synchronized cardioversion (0.5 to 1 J/kg for initial dose)



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Core Case 10 Bradycardia

Use this checklist during the PALS core case simulations and tests to check off the performance of the team leader.

CRITICAL PERFORMANCE STEPS DETAILS

TEAM LEADER

Assigns team member roles

Uses effective communication throughout

Closed-loop communication

Clear messages

Clear roles and responsibilities

Knowing limitations Knowledge sharing Constructive intervention Reevaluation and summarizing

Mutual respect

PATIENT MANAGEMENT

Directs assessment of airway, breathing, circulation

Team leader directs or performs assessment to determine disability, and exposure, including vital signs airway patency, adequacy of breathing and circulation, level of responsiveness, temperature and vital signs

Directs initiation of assisted ventilations with 100% oxygen

Team leader instructs team member to provide assisted ventilations with 100% oxygen

Directs placement of pads/leads and pulse oximetry

Team leader directs that pads/leads be properly placed and that monitor be turned onto an appropriate lead; requests use of pulse oximetry

Categorizes bradycardia with cardiorespiratory

Team leader recognizes rhythm and verbalizes presence of compromise bradycardia to team members

Characterizes as compensated or hypotensive

Team leader communicates that patient has cardiorespiratory compromise and is hypotensive

Recalls indications for chest compressions in a bradycardic patient (may or may not perform)

Team leader vervalizes indications for chest compressions

Directs IV or IO access

Team leader directs team member to place IV (or IO) access, if appropriate; placement simulated properly

Directs preparation and administration of appropriate dose of epinephrine

Team leader directs team member to prepare initial dose of epinephrine (0.01 mg/kg or 0.1 mL/kg of 1:10,000 dilution IV/IO,uses drug dose resource if needed: directs team member to administer epinephrine dose and saline flush

Directs reassessment of patient in response to treatment Team leader directs team member to reassess airway, breathing and circulation

CASE CONCLUSION

Verbalizes consideration of a least 3 underlying causes of bradycardia

Team leader verbalizes potentially reversible causes of bradycardia (toxins, hypothermia, increased ICP)



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Core Case 11 Asystole/PEA

Use this checklist during the PALS core case simulations and tests to check off the performance of the team leader.

CRITICAL PERFORMANCE STEPS DETAILS

TEAM LEADER

Assigns team member roles

Uses effective communication throughout

Closed-loop communication

Clear messages

Clear roles and responsibilities

Knowing limitations Knowledge sharing Constructive intervention Reevaluation and summarizing

Mutual respect

PATIENT MANAGEMENT

Recognizes cardiopulmonary arrest

Team leader directs or performs assessment to determine absence of responsiveness, breathing and pulse

Directs initiation of CPR by using the C-A-B sequence

Team leader monitors quality of CPR at all times (adequate rate, and ensures performance of high-quality CPR adequate depth, chest recoil) and provides feedback to team member providing compressions; directs resuscitation so as to minimize interruptions in CPR; directs team members to rotate role of chest compressor approximately every 2 minutes

Directs placement of pads/leads and pulse oximetry

Team leader directs that pads/leads be properly placed and that monitor be turned onto an appropriate lead; requests use of pulse oximetry

Recognizes asystole or PEA

Team leader recognizes rhythm and verbalizes presence of asystole or PEA to team members

Directs IV or IO access

Team leader directs team member to place IV (or IO) access, if appropriate; placement simulated properly

Directs preparation and administration of appropriate dose of epinephrine

Team leader directs team member to prepare initial dose of epinephrine (0.01 mg/kg or 0.1 mL/kg of 1:10,000 dilution IV/IO,uses drug dose resource if needed: directs team member to administer epinephrine dose and saline flush

Directs administration of epinephrine at appropriate intervals

Team leader directs team member to administer epinephrine dose with saline flush and prepare to administer again every 3 to 5 minutes

Directs checking rhythm on monitor approximately every 2 minutes

Team leader directs team members to stop compressions and checks rhythm on monitor approximately every 2 minutes

CASE CONCLUSION

Verbalizes consideration of a least 3 underlying causes of PEA or asystole

Team leader verbalizes potentially reversible causes of PEA or asystole (hypovolemia, tamponade)



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Core Case 12 VF/Pulseless VT

Use this checklist during the PALS core case simulations and tests to check off the performance of the team leader.

CRITICAL PERFORMANCE STEPS DETAILS

TEAM LEADER

Assigns team member roles

Uses effective communication throughout

Closed-loop communication

Clear messages

Clear roles and responsibilities

Knowing limitations Knowledge sharing Constructive intervention Reevaluation and summarizing

Mutual respect

PATIENT MANAGEMENT

Recognizes cardiopulmonary arrest

Team leader directs or performs assessment to determine absence of responsiveness, breathing and pulse

Directs initiation of CPR by using the C-A-B sequence

Team leader monitors quality of CPR (adequate rate, and ensures performance of high-quality CPR at all times adequate depth, chest recoil) and provides feedback to team member providing compressions; directs resuscitation so as to minimize interruptions in CPR; directs team members to rotate role of chest compressor approximately every 2 minutes

Directs placement of pads/leads and pulse oximetry

Team leader directs that pads/leads be properly placed and that monitor be turned onto an appropriate lead; requests use of pulse oximetry

Recognizes VF or pulseless VT

Team leader recognizes rhythm and verbalizes presence of VF/VT to team members

Directs attempted defibrillation at 2 to 4 J/kg safely Team leader direct team member to set proper energy and attempt defibrillation; observes for safe performance

Directs immediate resumption of CPR by using the C-A-B sequence

Team leader directs team member to resume CPR immediately after shock (no pulse or rhythm check)

Directs IV or IO access

Team leader directs team member to place IV (or IO) access, if appropriate; placement simulated properly

Directs preparation and administration of appropriate dose of epinephrine

Team leader directs team member to prepare initial dose of epinephrine (0.01 mg/kg or 0.1 mL/kg of 1:10,000 dilution IV/IO, uses drug dose resource if needed: directs team member to administer epinephrine dose and saline flush

Directs attempted defibrillation at 4 J/kg or higher

Team leader direct team member to set proper energy and (not to exceed 10 J/kg or standard adult dose safely attempt defibrillation; observes for safe performance

Directs immediate resumption of CPR by using the Team leader directs team member to resume CPR immediately C-A-B sequence after shock (no pulse or rhythm check)

Directs administration of epinephrine at appropriate intervals

Team leader directs team member to administer epinephrine dose with saline flush and prepare to administer again every 3 to 5 minutes

CASE CONCLUSION

Verbalizes consideration of antiarrhythmic (amiodarone or lidocaine)

Team leader indicates consideration of appropriate antiarrhythmic using appropriate dose in proper dose



WHEN TO CALL FOR HELP AND WHEN TO START COMPRESSIONS

If a child, check responsiveness, tap and shout "hey, are you ok ?"

Check for breathing: if no breathing activate emergency response system and get an AED

Check for a pulse: if no pulse begin chest compressions at a rate of 30:2

If the victim is UNDER PUBERTY, and there are 2 rescuers, begin 15:2

IF they are UNDER PUBERTY and the arrest is witnessed, GET HELP FIRST then return to the child and begin with compressions. Provide 2 minutes of CPR and check a pulse.

When you see a child collapse, (WITNESSED) you know their last breath and last heartbeat was just now. Their blood oxygen level should be pretty high. So get help first. If there are others around, send someone to get help and get and AED.

If you find a child who has collapsed and it was not witnessed, you have no idea if their blood oxygen level is adequate, so provide 2 minutes of CPR and get their blood oxygen level back up, then leave the child and go get help. If there are others around, send someone to get help and get and AED.

IF the arrest is NOT WITNESSED, Begin 2 minutes of CPR, go get help and an AED and return to the child. Begin cycles of 30 compressions and 2 breaths if you are alone. Check a pulse every 2 minutes.

If there are two rescuers and the child is under puberty, begin cycles of 15 compressions and 2 breaths. Check a pulse every 10 cycles or 2 minutes.

ONE MORE VERY IMPORTANT THING ABOUT KIDS

If the child is UNDER PUBERTY AND HAS A PULSE OF 60 or less BEGIN CHEST COMPRESSIONS.

Only perform chest compressions if they show signs of poor perfusion.

Are they cold, are their fingers or lips blue, does their color just not look right ? Are there any signs the child is not getting enough blood supply and oxygen? If you see these signs, BEGIN CHEST COMPRESSIONS. DO NOT DELAY.



CHOKING

For an adult or child, wrap your hands around the victim's waist and begin abdominal thrusts until the victim becomes unconscious or the foreign object is removed. For an infant, lay them over your forearm supporting the infant's head and neck and begin 5 back slaps (Be sure to cradle the infant face down with head lower than the rest of the body).

Turn the infant over and begin 5 chest thrusts (just as you would chest compressions). Continue with 5 back slaps and 5 chest compressions until the object is removed or the infant becomes unconscious.

Once an adult, child or infant becomes unconscious, do not continue to treat them as a chocking victim. Lay them on a hard flat surface and begin Basic Life Support. Start by tapping and shouting "Hey, Are you Ok ?" Assess breathing, if no breathing or only gasping, activate emergency response and get an AED. Begin chest compressions.

Before giving breaths, look in the mouth for the obstructing object. If you can see the object, try to remove it. Do not perform a blind finger sweep.

Attempt to give 2 rescue breaths. If the chest does not rise, reposition the airway and attempt again. If the chest does not rise, begin chest compressions. Between chest compressions and rescue breath attempts, it is hoped that the back and forth motions will move the object one way or the other.

Continue as long as you can and just know, that you cannot continue CPR forever. There may be a time when it is just not humanly possible to continue for hours and hours, nor would you want to continue CPR on someone for that length of time. The chances of successfully reviving someone without significant brain damage after an extended amount of time is very slim.



FOUR TYPES OF RESPIRATORY DISORDERS

UPPER AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION

These children will present with stridor. The most important INITIAL medication is IM Epi, or an EPI pen. Give steroids if the child has a history of asthma. Provide oxygenation. If the oxygen sat continues to drop despite oxygen administration then preparations need to be made for BVM or intubation.

LOWER AIRWAY OBSTRUCTION

This is bronchiolitis or asthma. Youíll hear wheezes and a prolonged expiratory phase. Provide nebulizer treatments, steroids and support the oxygen needs.

LUNG TISSUE DISEASE

This is pneumonia, or aspiration pneumonia. Expect to hear crackles. The child will have a low oxygen saturation and resp effort will be increased. Provide oxygenation, antibiotics and antipyretics. Obtain cultures if the fever is over 101.

DISORDERED CONTROL OF BREATHING

This is an example of a post dictal child, a brain injury or neuro child, or even a child that has been sedated and doesnít have control over their breathing. As long as their V/S are stable, simply monitor. The resp rate may only be 6, but if their sat is 99% on room air, just monitor.



FOUR TYPES OF SHOCK

CARDIOGENIC

Defined as cold and dusky hands and feet, murmur on auscultation, palpable liver and crackles to lung bases as the heart struggles to preserve the core and circulate the blood volume. Treatment includes antibiotics and fluids of ONLY 5-10ml/kg given very slowly. This will thin the blood and allow the sick heart to pump more efficiently clearing up the crackles in the lungs.

DISTRIBUTIVE/SEPTIC SHOCK

With septic shock, the child will have a very low BP, good cap refill, most likely a very high fever near or above 103. A child with a high fever who is on chemotherapy would be in septic shock with a very low BP. Treatment consists of supporting the airway, obtaining cultures, administering antibiotics and antipyretics and a fluid bolus of 20ml/kg given very quickly followed with vasopressors if the BP does not respond to the fluid bolus.

OBSTRUCTIVE SHOCK

This could be due to a tension pneumothorax. This will cause an obstruction of the oxygen which can lead to shock. Treatment consists of immediate correction of the pneumothorax with needle decompression and preparation of a chest tube. If the child is on a ventilator, and the oxygen saturation is 68%, Remember the D.O.P.E. mnemonic.

D.O.P.E.

D = Displacement

(Check to see that the tube has not moved and is still at the previous cm marking at the lip

O = Obstruction

Listen for breath sounds. If any breath sounds are heard, the tube is not obstructed or you would hear no breath sounds at all.

P = Pneumothorax

Check to see if breath sounds are equal. Is the trachea deviated (Very late sign in children) and check to see if there is equal rise and fall of the chest.

E = Equipment

This step should be preformed FIRST. Disconnect the ventilator, attach BVM and bag the child. If the O2 sat does NOT rise, it is not an equipment problem.



HYPOVOLEMIC SHOCK

This can be due to volume depletion caused by blood loss or by dehydration. Administer rapid fluid bolus of 20ml/kg over 5 minutes up to 3 times. If the BP does not respond then blood should be administered. A low blood pressure is a very late sign of shock in children. Children can maintain a normal blood pressure until they have lost 25% of their total blood volume.

Always keep childrenís O2 Sat between 94-99% to prevent hyperoxia. If the child is on oxygen and the sat is 100%, then turn the oxygen down to achieve a sat of 94-99%.

From the age of puberty and under. If the child has a pulse of 60 or less, begin chest compressions and treat them as though they have no pulse. Administer EPI. Do not give Atropine to a child for bradycardia until they are beyond puberty. The only exception is a 3rd Degree Block. In case of a 3rd degree block there must be a child appropriate dose.

If a childís heart slows down or stops, it is because they canít breathe. If a child has been in respiratory distress for a few days, and the heart rate begins to drop, and resp rate begins to drop itís because they are getting tired and are going to stop breathing. Begin ventilations with a BVM device. The same goes for a child in respiratory distress for a few days. If they have been struggling to breathe and you suction away what little bit of air they were able to get in, their heart rate will drop. Simply bag them and replace the oxygen you took away.

When you place a pulse ox on a child, make sure that the heart rate on the pulse ox correlates with the heart rate on the monitor. If the monitor shows a heart rate of 200, and your pulse ox says the heart rate is 99, the pulse ox is not reliable. So if it says the O2 sat is 98%, it is not reliable and the child must be given oxygen.

The best way to establish vascular access in a child is IO Intraosseous.

The preferred vagal maneuver in children is ice to the face.

When performing cardioversion for an unstable tachycardia, begin with Ĺ to 1J/kg.

When defibrillating, begin with 2J/kg, then 4J/kg, 6J/kg, 8J/kg and finally 10J/kg which is the maximum. Repeat 10J/kg as needed.

In children 1 year and under, check a brachial pulse.

When using an AED, if pediatric pads are not available, you may use adult pads. For a child, place them in the same place you would an adult. If it is an infant, always place one pad in the center of the chest, and one on the back directly behind the one on the chest.

As soon as an AED arrives, use it. Be sure to turn it on FIRST.

When performing CPR alone, everyone is 30 compressions and 2 breaths regardless of age. If the child is under puberty, and there are 2 rescuers, the ratio changes to 15:2

Just remember that children are not small adults. If an adult wants to increase their cardiac output, their cardiac muscle fibers stretch to hold move blood volume, thus they can pump more blood with each heartbeat. Kids can't do that. Their muscle fibers are very short and don't stretch enough to change cardiac output. All they can do is increase their heart rate. Kids can compensate too !

Did you know, that if a 4 year old child's body can hold 4 liters of blood, that they can lose an ENTIRE LITER (or 25% of their total circulating volume) and still maintain a normal blood pressure !!! Scary isn't it !!!! Kids can compensate for a while, but not forever. So if you notice a low blood pressure on a child, you have only a minute or two notice that the child is about to CODE ! If their blood pressure is low, that means their compensatory mechanisms are failing and in just a minute, they will completely stop ! Replace fluids quickly !!! Not over 20 min. They could be dead in 20 minutes. And make sure to check a blood sugar in every child. This is as high a priority, if not higher than a type and cross match. You see, if a child's blood sugar drops, they have no glycogen stores to fall back on. They must burn their own tissue as a source of energy. If they are busy burning their own tissue to survive, they are going to be a little too busy to metabolize any of the drugs you give them.

I hope this study guide has been helpful. If you have any questions or comments please let us know.

The American Heart Association (AHA) strongly promotes knowledge and proficiency in BLS, ACLS, and PALS and has developed instructional materials for this purpose. Use of these materials in an educational course does not represent course sponsorship by the AHA. Any fees charged for such a course, except for a portion of fees needed for AHA course materials, do not represent income to the AHA.

http://www.savingamericanhearts.com Catherine Brinkley (719) 551-1222 Saving American Hearts, Inc 6165 Lehman Drive Suite 202 Colorado Springs, Colorado 80918 admin@savingamericanhearts.com